Deutsches Eck

Day 3: June 12 2014, Oberwesel to Winningen

Before launching into today’s review, I must share a few of the pictures I took last night before sunset of the castle on top of the mountain that I was staying on. Built when the Romans had a settlement here!

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Here was the view from my window last night:

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Needless to say, my view this morning biking down the mountain was breathtaking. Set me up well for another perfectly pleasant day of biking.

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It cooled off a little bit today–still very sunny, but not quite so hot. I began my day along the now familiar Rhein. The bike path had me right along the shore for miles and miles.

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I passed through farms, saw tons of castles, and enjoyed the cluster of brightly colored houses that periodically dot the banks.

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It didn’t take long for me to reach the city of Koblenz, which was today’s big turning point!  Literally!  Koblenz sits on the corner where the Rhein and the Mosel Rivers connect. The point where the rivers meet is called the Deutsches Eck. Here it is!

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I had lunch at the Eck, and then carried on, a bit discombobulated because now the river was on my left side. The Mosel is narrower and twistier than the Rhein. Here’s a view from a bridge crossing to its right bank:

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Vineyards are a big deal here, too. At one point as I neared my destination for the day, I somehow got onto an alternative bike path (NOT lost.  I knew exactly where I was and how to get where I needed to be), which took me off the shore and into the steep hills of the vineyards.

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And now, I’m back on the banks of the river settled in for the evening in a town called Winningen.

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And just in case you forget what I look like:

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I don’t smell good. But I’m loving these days, and soaking up a part of Germany that I’ve never known.

9 thoughts on “Deutsches Eck

  1. Thank you so much for sharing your adventure with us! I love the picture of the vineyard steps. Great composition! And the turtle. That’s a tragedy waiting to happen. Real emotional depth in that one. Is it yours???

  2. Turtle as a metaphor for Christine’s head in a helmet– Yuck! Or should I say Eck! Slightly more seriously, does Eck translate or is it just a name with no particular meaning?
    Anyway, Christine, the photos are beautiful– it must’ve been a great trip. Hope that loneliness was not a factor. Did being on the rode alone make you feel free??? Hope so… in any case it looks like a wonderful ride even with the rarity of vegetables. Maybe we can do some kind of trip over there next summer?

    • Yes! A great trip!! And yes–let’s do something like it together soon!! Eck translates to “corner”–Deutsches Eck is the German corner, where the rivers meet.

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